General Radiology (X-Ray / Fluoroscopy)

GENERAL RADIOLOGY (X-RAY / FLUOROSCOPY) PROCEDURES:

ARTHROGRAM

Arthrogram Image (Hand)
An arthrogram is a diagnostic study of a joint space such as the shoulder, knee, or wrist using iodine contrast material. We usually use arthrograms to detect ligament, tendon, or cartilage tears in a joint or other pathology. After injecting the contrast material into the joint, the radiologist will remove the needle and take x-rays. The exam takes approximately 45 minutes, depending on which joint is being studied. In most cases, an arthrogram is followed by an MRI of the joint.

We also perform arthrograms to determine if a patient's pain is arising from the joint. This is typically done of the hip joint. In these cases, we inject a small amount of dye in the joint, followed by a numbing medicine and an anti-inflammatory medication.

Procedure Preparation:

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BARIUM ENEMA (BE) / LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL (LOWER GI)

For a BE or Lower GI, we use a method called fluoroscopy. Fluoroscopy uses x-rays to capture a moving image of an organ. The technologist will insert a small tube into your rectum and fill the colon with barium.

This exam enables the radiologist to visualize your colon using fluoroscopy, which is often the most effective way to view abnormal or blocked movement of waste through your body's lower GI tract. We also use these exams for early detection of colon cancer.

Procedure Preparation:

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BARIUM SWALLOW / UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL (UPPER GI)

Upper GI Image (Barium Swallow)
An Upper Gastrointestinal series, usually called an Upper GI, is an x-ray examination of the esophagus, stomach, and first part of the small intestine. However, in order for your anatomy to show up on radiographic images, your upper GI tract must be coated or filled with a contrast material called barium, an element that appears white on x-rays. Because you must drink barium for this exam, an upper GI is also called a barium swallow x-ray.

Additionally, you may be asked to swallow baking-soda crystals to create gas and further improve the images; this procedure has the modified name of air-contrast upper GI.

Procedure Preparation:

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HYSTEROSALPINGOGRAM

A hysterosalpingogram is an x-ray examination of the uterus and fallopian tubes. You will be placed in a position similar to that of a gynecological exam. The radiologist will insert a speculum then clean off your cervix with a sterile solution.
Hysterosalpingogram Image
The radiologist will then place a small catheter (a thin, flexible tube) into your cervical canal and inject a contrast medium or dye so that he or she can see the uterus and fallopian tubes on film. The radiologist will watch the contrast flow through your uterus and fallopian tubes on a monitor.

At intervals, you will be asked to hold your breath, to exhale, or to change your position so that films may be taken. You may experience discomfort or cramping with the injection of the contrast.

Procedure Preparation:

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INTRAVENOUS PYELOGRAM (IVP)

An IVP is an x-ray examination of the kidneys, ureters (the tubes between the kidneys and the bladder), and urinary bladder using a contrast material to enhance the x-ray images. Contrast material is injected into your vein and its progress through your urinary tract is then recorded on a series of quickly captured images.

The exam enables the radiologist to review your anatomy and the function of your kidneys and urinary tract.

Procedure Preparation:

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MYELOGRAM

Myelogram Image (Spine)
A myelogram is an x-ray of your spine used to determine if there is any decrease or blockage in the flow of cerebral spinal fluid (the liquid that surrounds the brain and the spine) within the spinal canal. We use this examination to diagnose a bulging disc, tumor, or changes in the bones surrounding the spinal cord.

In most cases, an MRI is usually diagnostic, and because it is not invasive, it is the preferred test for obvious spinal disorders. However, sometimes the MRI cannot give your doctor all the information he or she needs, and myelogram will be needed.

Myelograms are often followed by a CT scan of the same area.

Procedure Preparation:

Please call our office at (805) 542-9700 for directions on how to prepare for this procedure.

VOIDING CYSTOURETHROGRAM (VCUG)

A Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG) is an x-ray examination of the bladder and lower urinary tract. A catheter is inserted through your urethra, your bladder is filled with a water-soluble dye, and then the catheter is withdrawn. We will then capture several x-ray images of the bladder and urethra as you empty your bladder.

These images allow the radiologist to diagnose any abnormalities in the flow of urine through your lower urinary tract.

Procedure Preparation:

No special preparations are required for this procedure. We just ask that your bladder not be completely empty and that your bladder have some urine in it.

X-RAY (RADIOGRAPHY)

X-Ray (Radiography)
Radiography, known to most people as x-ray, is the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging.

For over a century, diagnostic images have been created by passing small, controlled amounts of radiation through the human body, and capturing the resulting shadows and reflections on a photographic plate or film.

Procedure Preparation:

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